Armadillo Trapping

catch these digging pests & prevent damage to your property: Armadillo control and removal for Orlando

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Animal Removal in Florida, FL
Apopka, Kissimmee, Oviedo, FL

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Controlling Armadillo Problems

animal digging lawn photo How to trap for armadillo    
Florida armadillos cannot be lured into a trap - their food is everywhere!. Dillos do not respond to bait at all. Learn the techniques to use to catch and remove armadillo..
armadillo trapper Photo Gallery of Armadillos in Orlando    
The Wildlife Patrol armadillo photo gallery has some of our favorite photos of this critter that we've taken over the years.
animal removal pic Signs of Armadillo Digging     Armadillo dig 2 types of holes - feeding holes and shelter holes. The shelter holes are called burrows and can extend up to 15ft.. The surface holes are cone-shaped and dug as the critter grazes for grubs.
orlando armadillo photo Removing and Preventing Armadillos     Wildlife Patrol removes Orlando armadillos through trapping and by hand when possible.  Armadillos are not a dangerous animal, but searching their burrows can be dangerous if other animals - ie diamondback rattlesnakes - have taken over their burrow.  Is there any way to prevent their digging?


Wildilfe Problems Due To Armadillos

Armadillos distress Florida homeowners with their ferocious digging abilities. Nice, neat lawn one day... nice, neat holes the next. Armadillos rip up flower beds and fresh sod in their pursuit of grubs. These critters dig burrows for temporary shelter. If the burrow extends under a building, the concrete foundation may be compromised. Follow the links below to learn more and see why our company provides the best Orlando armadillo control.
Orlando Armadillo Pic

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     expert right now:
407-810-1381

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Animals in the attic?  Attic pest control for immediate expert critter help!

 

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Once you've trapped your armadillo, you can release it away from your yard. To stop it from coming back, you can release it somewhere it is likely to be happy. Try to let it go near water — a lake, stream or pond will do. There should be some amount of brush or other cover nearby for it to hide in. I should warn you that relocation doesn’t always work, though. Armadillos are not strongly territorial, and the one you are removing today could be the one who was digging up someone else’s yard the day before. They tend to wander about looking for food, so action taken against one particular animal might just create an opening for another one to wander on in.

After you’re sure your visitor is gone, fill in the hole. If you start by plugging the entrance loosely, and then monitor it daily, you will avoid trapping an animal underground, and you’ll be able to see if it has come back to re-open the burrow. After several days of no noticeable disturbance, you can safely refill the hole with a mixture of earth and pea gravel, to make it harder to dig open again.

If you had an armadillo under your foundation, you may need to take additional steps to make sure your visitor does not return after you have evicted it. Once you’re sure that it is gone, plug the entrance loosely as described above. After monitoring for a few days to make sure it is gone, plug the hole securely. To keep it from returning, you can bury an L-shaped section of fencing against the foundation, to keep the armadillo you removed (or any other animal) from burrowing back under the house.

 

If you have an animal burrowed in your yard or under your house, you probably want it to leave. The simplest method of removal would be to try something with a strong odor to encourage it to move out. Dropping mothballs down the hole might help evict it, although one reader reported that the armadillo just threw the mothballs back out. If that doesn’t work, you could always try a rag soaked in vinegar or ammonia (anything with a mild form of ammonia, like Windex, should be enough to do the trick — if it smells bad to you, it ought to smell absolutely awful to an armadillo).

If you have an armadillo under your foundation, you may need to take additional steps to make sure your visitor leaves and does not come back. The best method is to build a “trap door” that will allow the armadillo to leave, but will not let it back into the burrow. A heavy cloth or lightweight section of wire mesh fencing placed over the hole and secured loosely at one side should allow any armadillo still inside the burrow to push its way out, but it wouldn’t be able to re-enter very easily. Combining the trap door with something smelly ought to double your chances of a successful removal.

If you have an armadillo under your foundation, you may need to take additional steps to make sure your visitor leaves and does not come back. The best method is to build a “trap door” that will allow the armadillo to leave, but will not let it back into the burrow. A heavy cloth or lightweight section of wire mesh fencing placed over the hole and secured loosely at one side should allow any armadillo still inside the burrow to push its way out, but it wouldn’t be able to re-enter very easily. Combining the trap door with something smelly ought to double your chances of a successful removal.

 

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